Wreaths in memory of Indian soldiers who died in World War I

Photo:The Royal Pavilion was used as a military hospital for wounded Indian soldiers during World War I

The Royal Pavilion was used as a military hospital for wounded Indian soldiers during World War I

At the Royal Pavilion India Gate, 18th October 2014

On Saturday 18th October 2014 wreaths were laid at a ceremony at the India Gate of the Royal Pavilion in memory of Indian soldiers who were treated at Brighton's hospitals during the First World War, having fought on the Western Front.

Attended by the Indian High Commissioner

Ranjan Mathai, the Indian High Commissioner, attended the event alongside Cllr Brian Fitch, Mayor of Brighton & Hove, and Davinder Dhillion, chairman of the Chattri Memorial group.

India Gate was a gift from India

During the First World War a number of buildings in the city, including the Royal Pavilion, the Dome and the Corn Exchange, were converted into military hospitals to care for Indian soldiers. The India Gate was a gift from India to commemorate soldiers tended in the Pavilion and was unveiled by the Maharaja of Patiala in October 1921.

Comment by Mayor of Brighton & Hove

The Mayor said: "The wreath laying at the Royal Pavilion's India Gate was a fitting way to honour their memory and the contribution they made in the war, fighting so far away from home."

 

[Previously published in the North Laine Runner, No 231, November/December 2014]

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